Turnover, Interlocal Collaboration and Organizational Performance: Testing Mediator and Moderator Effects

Abstract

That leadership turnover produces profound organizational outcomes has been documented in the public management and urban governance literature. However, empirical evidence regarding the turnover-performance relationship so far still remains elusive. To disentangle their mix associations, this study investigates the mediating and moderating role of interlocal collaboration. Theoretically, interlocal collaboration can be an appealing institutional arrangement for policy problems which single governments actions cannot fully or efficiently solve. And interlocal collaboration can potentially affect the turnover-performance in two ways. Leadership turnover may initiate the reassessment of the adoption of such institutional arrangement, so institutional restructure following turnover events would exert impacts on organizational performance. On the other hand, the interdependency between collaborative partners embedded in policy problems and past interactions could preclude unilateral termination of collaborative relations, leaving new leaders who cannot reselect partners at their will, but need to manage the existing collaboration with limited human and social capitals incapable of reversing and maintaining a trend. To test our hypotheses, we collected the data of leadership turnover, interlocal agreement in police services, and crime incidents in Nebraska from 2012 to 2018. Using system generalized method of moment model, empirical findings reject the mediation effect while causally support that the size of interlocal collaboration network moderates the positive effect of executive turnover on organizational performance.

Yixin Liu
Yixin Liu
PhD Candidate